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From the people who brought you 'Hillbillies In Hell'... Stellar songs, heartfelt performances, the finest Nashville players and the greatest set of tonsils to ever wrap themselves around Activist Country-Pop... Here are the almost forgotten masterpieces of Henson Cargill, sourced directly from the Monument Records vault and presented together for the first time on LP. Hear Henson's smooth baritone lambast apathy ('None of My Business'), chide neglectful parenting ('Skip A Rope'), ponder the byzantine tableaux of love ('Four Shades of Love'), dismiss the space race and dissect de-evolution ('Going Backwards') and name-check both Adolph Eichmann and Cecil B. DeMille in one very lysergic song ('What's my Name?'). Across 1967-1970, Cargill pioneered a unique and radical New Nashville Sound. Swinging, dobro-led shuffles with controversial, cosmic/striking themes and insightful lyrics. Dystopian and defiant anti-war laments. Tender and timeless brooding ballads of regret. Wise, worldly and weary. 16 prime cuts of Psyche-Gnashville brilliance. Witness the Hillbilly Zen of 'Row Row Row', the Apocalyptic revelations of 'This Generation Shall Not Pass' and the acerbic disestablishmentarianism of 'Reprints (Plastic People)'. Nashville 1967, something was in the water and Henson Cargill drank his fill.
From the people who brought you 'Hillbillies In Hell'... Stellar songs, heartfelt performances, the finest Nashville players and the greatest set of tonsils to ever wrap themselves around Activist Country-Pop... Here are the almost forgotten masterpieces of Henson Cargill, sourced directly from the Monument Records vault and presented together for the first time on LP. Hear Henson's smooth baritone lambast apathy ('None of My Business'), chide neglectful parenting ('Skip A Rope'), ponder the byzantine tableaux of love ('Four Shades of Love'), dismiss the space race and dissect de-evolution ('Going Backwards') and name-check both Adolph Eichmann and Cecil B. DeMille in one very lysergic song ('What's my Name?'). Across 1967-1970, Cargill pioneered a unique and radical New Nashville Sound. Swinging, dobro-led shuffles with controversial, cosmic/striking themes and insightful lyrics. Dystopian and defiant anti-war laments. Tender and timeless brooding ballads of regret. Wise, worldly and weary. 16 prime cuts of Psyche-Gnashville brilliance. Witness the Hillbilly Zen of 'Row Row Row', the Apocalyptic revelations of 'This Generation Shall Not Pass' and the acerbic disestablishmentarianism of 'Reprints (Plastic People)'. Nashville 1967, something was in the water and Henson Cargill drank his fill.
934334410757
What's My Name (1967-1970) (Gate) [Limited Edition]
Artist: Henson Cargill
Format: Vinyl
New: Available $35.98
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From the people who brought you 'Hillbillies In Hell'... Stellar songs, heartfelt performances, the finest Nashville players and the greatest set of tonsils to ever wrap themselves around Activist Country-Pop... Here are the almost forgotten masterpieces of Henson Cargill, sourced directly from the Monument Records vault and presented together for the first time on LP. Hear Henson's smooth baritone lambast apathy ('None of My Business'), chide neglectful parenting ('Skip A Rope'), ponder the byzantine tableaux of love ('Four Shades of Love'), dismiss the space race and dissect de-evolution ('Going Backwards') and name-check both Adolph Eichmann and Cecil B. DeMille in one very lysergic song ('What's my Name?'). Across 1967-1970, Cargill pioneered a unique and radical New Nashville Sound. Swinging, dobro-led shuffles with controversial, cosmic/striking themes and insightful lyrics. Dystopian and defiant anti-war laments. Tender and timeless brooding ballads of regret. Wise, worldly and weary. 16 prime cuts of Psyche-Gnashville brilliance. Witness the Hillbilly Zen of 'Row Row Row', the Apocalyptic revelations of 'This Generation Shall Not Pass' and the acerbic disestablishmentarianism of 'Reprints (Plastic People)'. Nashville 1967, something was in the water and Henson Cargill drank his fill.
        
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